Hope is a discipline exhibition image; Photo by Nick Lacey,

Hope is a discipline

Upper Gallery at The Arts Center at Governors Island
Opening Saturday, July 27, 2024 12-6pm | Reception 4-6pm
On view through September 29, 2024

Hope is a discipline inhabits the words of Mariame Kaba, who proposes that hope is neither just a feeling, nor a horizon but something we do together, using the resources we already have. This concept of hope inspired a curatorial collective, who envisioned Hope is a discipline to be a traveling project that generates a translocal network of thought partners who practice hope as communal labor. The first iteration took shape as a series of gatherings centered on the question, “Can friendship create structural change?” The New York iteration at LMCC features an ensemble of US-based artists foregrounding memory and history: Adama Delphine Fawundu, Kyuri Jeon, Suneil Sanzgiri, Bread and Puppet Theater, and Maggie Wong. Here, Hope is a discipline takes shape in art of impermanence, intergenerational research, and the body as an archive. How do we find, remember, and share in the struggles of ancestors? How are land, water, and our bodies memory-keepers? How is memory, attention, and time political?

Hope is a discipline at LMCC is initiated by Meghana Karnik, LMCC’s Curatorial Fellow 2024, and co-curated with Eugene Hannah Park (ISCP Curator-in-Residence, New York/Seoul), Marina Christodoulidou (de Appel Curatorial Fellow, Amsterdam/Limassol), and Billy Fowo (Curator, SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin/Yaoundé).

Artists Featured: Adama Delphine FawunduKyuri JeonSuneil SanzgiriBread and Puppet TheaterMaggie Wong.

Artist Bios

Adama Delphine Fawundu is a photographer and visual artist of Mende, Krim, Bamileke and Bubi descent. Her distinct visual language centered around themes of indigenization, and ancestral memory, enriches and expands the visual art canon. Fawundu co-published the critically acclaimed book MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora. She is an Assistant Professor of Visual Art at Columbia University.

Kyuri Jeon is an interdisciplinary artist based in New York/Seoul. In the form of installation, video, and performance. Jeon explores interconnectedness of language, gender, and identity manifested on the body through the lenses of transnational and intersectional perspectives. Jeon’s work has been featured internationally at venues including MassArt Art Museum, USA; The Institute of Contemporary Art, USA; Artists’ Moving Image Festival, UK; Festival Film Dokumenter, Indonesia; Women Make Waves, Taiwan; and DMZ International Documentary Film Festival, South Korea. She holds BFA from Korea National University of Arts, and MFA from the University of Pennsylvania and Seoul National University. She is a recipient of Toby Devan Lewis Fellowship, and Second Prize in Asian Shorts Competition, Seoul International Women’s Film Festival.

Suneil Sanzgiri is an artist, researcher, and filmmaker. Spanning experimental video and film, animations, essays, and installations, his work contends with questions of identity, heritage, culture, and diaspora in relation to structural violence and anticolonial struggles across the Global South. Sanzgiri’s films offer sonic and visual journeys through family history, local mythology, and colonial legacies of extraction in Goa, India—where his family originates—deftly utilizing and vividly blending together 3D renderings, drone videography, photogrammetry and lidar scanning, 16 mm film and animation, archival footage, and desktop documentary practices.

Sanzgiri’s work has been screened extensively at festivals and venues around the world including the International Film Festival Rotterdam, New York Film Festival, Hong Kong International Film Festival, Camden International Film Festival, Sheffield Doc/Fest, Doclisboa, Viennale, REDCAT, Menil Collection, Block Museum, MASS MoCA, moCa Cleveland, Le Cinéma Club, Criterion Collection, and many more. He has won awards at the BlackStar Film Festival, Open City Documentary Festival, Images Festival, Videoex, and more. Fellowships and residencies include SOMA, MacDowell, Pioneer Works, Sentient.Art.Film’s Line of Sight, and Flaherty NYC. He was named one of the 25 New Faces of Independent Film in Filmmaker Magazine’s fall 2021 issue and was included in Art in America’s New Talent issue in 2022.

Sanzgiri is currently working on his first feature-length work, focusing on the bonds of solidarity that developed out of resistance to the Portuguese empire between India and Africa.

Bread and Puppet Theater The Bread and Puppet Theater is an internationally celebrated company that champions a visually rich, street-theater brand of performance art filled with music, dance and slapstick. Believing that theater is a basic necessity like bread, the company frequently brings its work to the streets for those who may not otherwise go to the theater. Its shows are political and spectacular, with puppets often on stilts, wearing huge masks with expressive faces, singing, dancing and playing music. 

Bread and Puppet is constantly active, performing at its farm in Glover, VT, and in local churches, schools and parades. It regularly tours Europe, Canada, and the United States and has recently visited El Salvador, Haiti, Russia, and Korea. Founded in 1963 by Peter Schumann on New York City’s Lower East Side, the theater has been based in the North East Kingdom of Vermont since the early 1970s and is one of the oldest, nonprofit, self-supporting theatrical companies in the country.

Bread and Puppet Theater The Bread and Puppet Theater is an internationally celebrated company that champions a visually rich, street-theater brand of performance art filled with music, dance and slapstick. Believing that theater is a basic necessity like bread, the company frequently brings its work to the streets for those who may not otherwise go to the theater. Its shows are political and spectacular, with puppets often on stilts, wearing huge masks with expressive faces, singing, dancing and playing music. 

Bread and Puppet is constantly active, performing at its farm in Glover, VT, and in local churches, schools and parades. It regularly tours Europe, Canada, and the United States and has recently visited El Salvador, Haiti, Russia, and Korea. Founded in 1963 by Peter Schumann on New York City’s Lower East Side, the theater has been based in the North East Kingdom of Vermont since the early 1970s and is one of the oldest, nonprofit, self-supporting theatrical companies in the country.

Maggie Wong is a visual artist attuned to materiality and sculpture’s disciplinary capacity to shape social space. She creates multidisciplinary works that focus on care labor, sentimentality, and collectivity. As a teacher. Maggie is interested in the interplay between informal and experiential education amidst formal art ecologies. She holds an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC). She is currently the Educator-in-Residence at the Luminary, and lecturer at SAIC. Her work has been shown at Mana Contemporary Chicago, Comfort Station, Annas Projects, take care (LA), Temple Contemporary, YBCA, and 99cent Plus, and has been written about in ArtForum and Sixty Inches from Center. Her writing has been published by Yale University Press, Viral Ecologies, and the Journal of Art Practice.

Curator Bios

Meghana Karnik explores paradoxes between art and social change, spirituality and economy, lived experience and institutional process. Her research plays out across modalities as a curator, arts administrator, artist, and writer. She is currently the inaugural Curatorial Fellow at LMCC, stewarding the New York iteration of Hope is a discipline. Her first book, Process-As-Practice—written with SHAWNÉ MICHELAIN HOLLOWAY, Elena Levi, and Maggie Wong—is being published by For The Birds Trapped in Airports in late 2024. Formerly, she was Manager, Grants & Artist Initiatives at Art Matters Foundation (New York), where she helped implement Artist2Artist, a grant program that gives philanthropic power to artists; Associate Curator for FRONT International: Cleveland Triennial for Contemporary Art (Oh Gods of Dust and Rainbows, 2022); and Associate Director of EFA Project Space (New York), a cross-disciplinary venue where she produced guest-curated exhibitions and SHIFT: A Residency for Arts Workers. She has served advisory roles for The Immigrant Artist Biennial and Critical Practices, Inc.

Marina Christodoulidou (de Appel Curatorial Fellow, Amsterdam/Limassol) is a researcher and curator based in Nicosia. Traversing curatorial formats, her practice emerges from critical, artist-led infrastructures and self-organized initiatives. Her projects often take the form of discursive exhibitions, writing, socially engaged practice and architecture. Marina's decolonial reading of Cyprus history and the complexities of its partition act as a departure point for her research and approach. Marina has previously worked for the Cyprus Pavilion at the Venice Art Biennale (2015-19), and co-curated the Anachoresis project which represented Cyprus at the Architecture Biennale (2021). Anachoresis proposed the table as an object which projects a spatial protocol of sociality. Selected projects include hypersurfacing (2019) at NiMAC in Nicosia, an exhibition and a forum showcasing the synergies and plurality of contemporary art practices in Cyprus and internationally. The Broken Pitcher (2020-) is an ongoing collaborative project that re-enacts an eviction story, with the colonial history of debt as its backdrop, and seeks out potentials for interacting with it. TBP has been presented in public squares across Cyprus, at Thkio Ppalies, Nicosia; Beirut Art Center; GfZK, Leipzig.

Marina Christodoulidou (de Appel Curatorial Fellow, Amsterdam/Limassol) is a researcher and curator based in Nicosia. Traversing curatorial formats, her practice emerges from critical, artist-led infrastructures and self-organized initiatives. Her projects often take the form of discursive exhibitions, writing, socially engaged practice and architecture. Marina's decolonial reading of Cyprus history and the complexities of its partition act as a departure point for her research and approach. Marina has previously worked for the Cyprus Pavilion at the Venice Art Biennale (2015-19), and co-curated the Anachoresis project which represented Cyprus at the Architecture Biennale (2021). Anachoresis proposed the table as an object which projects a spatial protocol of sociality. Selected projects include hypersurfacing (2019) at NiMAC in Nicosia, an exhibition and a forum showcasing the synergies and plurality of contemporary art practices in Cyprus and internationally. The Broken Pitcher (2020-) is an ongoing collaborative project that re-enacts an eviction story, with the colonial history of debt as its backdrop, and seeks out potentials for interacting with it. TBP has been presented in public squares across Cyprus, at Thkio Ppalies, Nicosia; Beirut Art Center; GfZK, Leipzig.

Billy Fowo (Curator, SAVVY Contemporary—The Laboratory of Form-Ideas, Berlin/Yaoundé) is a curator and writer. Very much grounded in the idea of the Laboratory, for Billy, rethinking and stretching the idea of the exhibition as a format, forms an essential part of his research and curatorial approach. With points of interest in various fields and disciplines such as the sonic, linguistics and literature, Billy Fowo questions through his practice what is considered knowledge and the spaces in which we find knowledge. Recently, he co-curated projects such as Unraveling The (Under-) Development Complex, An Ode to Walter Rodney’s “How Europe Underdeveloped Africa”, 50 Years On (1972 - 2022), SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin (2022), Wata Go Lef Stone, On the Perpetuity of Accara Across the Oceans, an offering within A Parábola Do Progresso, Sesc Pompeia, São Paulo (2022), ENIGMA #59: ROMAN – a retrospection on / by Paris-based artist Bili Bidjocka, SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin (2021). Billy Fowo is one of the cooradinators of SAVVY Records – one of the newly founded SAVVY Pillars.

Eugene Hannah Park (ISCP Curator-in-Residence, New York/Seoul) explores the possibility of learning by collective minds. She curates and produces tools and platforms as an ingredient to share questions and translate worlds. Eugene anticipates connecting different languages of peers hoping this will lead to constructing new constellations. She recently co-curated Hope is a discipline(de Appel, Amsterdam, 2023), and curated Arecibo(TINC, Seoul, 2022) and continues to work as part of collectives such as Against The Dragon Light (ADL) and Asian Feminist Studio for Art and Research (AFSAR).